Setting Up A Watercolor (or Gouache) Palette

 Hey my peeps, just a quick spotlight on your palette today. How do you know what colors to buy, how do you save money trying new kinds of paints, how can you store the paints you have so they’re accessible? I’m combining tips for watercolor and gouache palettes here because they go so swimmingly well together they’re often used in conjunction.

 

TIP #1 - YOU ONLY NEED A FEW COLORS

If you’re new to painting, or just trying a new medium like gouache instead of your usual acrylic, buy the highest quality paint you can afford but only the primary colors and an opaque white (if not using watercolor). If you want a dark you don’t have to mix from scratch every time I’d recommend a Paynes Gray rather than a black.  Paynes Gray leans towards the cool side but maintains a lot more vibrancy than any regular black will when used straight or in mixes. Alternately you can skip the dark, and mix the three primary colors together to make your own dark and save some money. The color wheel is your best friend and you can mix literally everything you need from the three primaries.

 

TIP #2 - SINGLE PIGMENT PAINTS V.S. MULTI-PIGMENT PAINTS

When you decide to expand your color range with new paints, try to avoid buying paints that are made from more than 1 pigment unless you know you are madly in love with the color and will use it all the freaking time. Paints can be made with 1 pigment or more, and multi-pigment paints can be really beautiful. The problem is that they tend not to mix as well and get muddy when combined with other colors much more easily than a single pigment paint would. If you combine two multi-pigment paints it’s the same as having combined four or more single pigment paints, so you can imagine that could get wonky looking real quickly when mixing stuff together.   On artist quality paint tubes, the pigments used will be listed so you can tell what it’s made from. They’ll usually also tell you how lightfast (fade-proof) and opaque or transparent they are. With watercolors they’ll also say if they granulate or not which is something you should keep in mind if you don’t like texture in your paintings.

 

TIP #3 - MIX HONEY INTO GOUACHE

This one is specifically for my gouache squad out there. I adore painting with gouache, but having to keep tubes of it out to use can be really limiting if you want to paint outside or are just lazy like me. If you’re lazy like me you may have already tried leaving gouache out to dry on a palette and tried to re-wet it, and may have already discovered that most gouache brands don’t take to this well. Gouache cracks and crumbles as it dries and can be hard to impossible to re-wet to its former glorious consistency and opacity. Here’s a hack for that if you want to have it all, like I do.  Mix a tiny amount of honey into your gouache thoroughly before putting it in a pan to dry (you can also use liquid glycerin for this though I haven’t gotten to try that personally yet). This little bit of honey will stop the cracking and drying out that usually happens, and leave your gouache incredibly smooth and re-wetable on your palette.

*Note: Some brands of gouache like M. Graham already have honey in them because they use it as the binder for the pigment. I personally really dislike the sheen and sticky texture this leaves behind. So I use non-honey based brands of gouache and put WAY less honey in mine to get the best of both worlds - my colors still dry matte and aren’t sticky but are super palette friendly. 

 

TIP #4 - MIX WATERCOLORS WITH GOUACHE

Another gouachey tip is for those of you who already have some watercolors but want to try gouache out too. To start only buy a white tube of gouache and mix your watercolor pigments into the white paint. It pretty much instantly transforms your watercolors into gouache and you can get a feel for the qualities gouache has, like the opacity, fairly intense shift in color as it dries, layering capacity, and the consistency of the paint you need to mix to get the coverage that you want in any given situation. 

 

TIP #5 - PAINT FROM TUBES OR PANS

For watercolorists, I suggest you experiment to see whether you prefer working from tubes or from dried pans. I know some people are tubers for life and feel they get the most vibrant colors that way. For me personally I NEED my pans - they save so much money in wasted paint over time and are incredibly convenient. I wouldn’t trade them for all the tubes in the world.  So I buy my paint in tubes, but squeeze it out to dry in pans and I’ve never felt like I’ve lost any color vibrancy doing things this way.

 

TIP #6  - PRE-MADE WATERCOLOR PALETTES V.S. BUYING YOUR OWN COLORS

It’s up to you whether you buy a pre-made palette or buy individual colors and make your own, but my personal recommendation would be to get your own colors. If you stick with the primaries and a white you should be able to afford higher quality paints for the same amount as a pre-made palette with other colors you may not want in the long run, or the crappy paint brush with hairs sticking out everywhere that every pre-made palette inevitably comes with. And as for the actual palette you start with, seriously to this day I use a plate to mix my paints on - you just really don’t need to buy a palette if you don’t want to. And if you do want a palette to store many colors in but don’t want to spend much money on one you can make your own palette really easily. A great video for this is from the YouTube channel In Liquid Color and you can find it here - I HIGHLY recommend this channel for learning more about pigments, binders, color mixing, palettes, brands of paint, etc...especially for watercolor artists, but not exclusively as much of the information crosses over to other mediums.

 

IN SUMMARY

I hope these tips help give you some direction to start a new palette or start with a new medium without breaking the bank. These are all things I had to learn the hard way (I’m talking to you, huge collection of expensive Arcyla-Gouache I have and hate to paint with), so hopefully you can learn from some of my mistakes. 

Experimenting With Art Styles

Experimenting with Art Styles

Greetings fine people. Today I want to talk about experimenting with your art style, because it’s my favorite thing to talk about in the world. Art has an infinite capacity for exploration, learning, and expression and that is amazing. Style experiments can help you find your style if you don’t know what it is, improve your art at any stage of skill, and be really refreshing if you feel like you’re stuck in a rut. 

This topic could be huge, so I’m going to limit it to the example of some studies I did this week. There will be some tips at the end in case you want to try some style experiments of your own.

Enter the Experiment Zone

For my experiments this week I used a reference image of some free-range sea lions I took in Newport, Oregon. I painted this same image 3 different ways, none of which focused on realism. I honestly dislike all of them as paintings, but I had a lot of fun, learned a bunch, and gained a lot of insight into new things I’d like to explore so it was completely 100% totally super worth it and you should definitely try this at home.

sea lions newport oregon wildlife illustration reference image

Watercolor Wildlife Illustration

For my first attempt I decided to try the old school combo of inked lines and watercolor washes because I’ve never tried it in earnest. I stayed pretty limited on color choices, and didn’t really use the ink lines very expressively which is something I’d change if I were to do this again.

sea lion watercolor wildlife illustration study

Colorful Wildlife Gouache Paintings

For my next two studies I really focused more on color since the first one felt so dull. This second study was all about picking random colors and trying to make them work by fitting them into to places with a similar value to the reference image. I also challenged myself to use an oversized flat brush in straight lines, only to see if I could do it. The brush was hard too work with and I went way overboard on the colors so I decided to change things up for the third painting.

wildlife animal illustration art study gouache painting

This third study was done with a smaller round brush instead of the unwieldy flat one and I tried to mix in some more realistic colors. I also really focused on lost edges in places of condensed shadow.

wildlife animal illustration art study gouache painting

Like I said before, I don't love all of these studies as end results, but they were completely worth doing. I learned SO much trying these different things out and now I have many new ideas of things I’d like to refine and add to my personal paintings in the future. I can’t recommend doing studies like these enough. So if you’re game to try, here are some tips.

Art Style Tips For Experimenting

1. Work small and use the same drawing transferred to multiple sheets of paper. You save drawing time, and learn about the image each time you paint it, which can help you come up with ideas for new things to try next time.

2. Listen to artists teaching core principles for ideas of things to explore, or look at art that inspires you and try to incorporate something you like about it into your painting. These things are easily found on the almighty interwebs.

3. Look in unusual places for ideas. For example, I usually paint in a semi-realistic style but I've been doing a lot of studying in animation art books. Really skilled artists making things that look wholly different than anything you do can still have a lot to teach you.

3. Have a clear and defined goal or focus for each study you do, and write it down on your paper before you start to paint. It helps remind you what your focus should be and what the point of the study is so you don’t get lost or discouraged halfway through it.

4. Use a really ugly sketchbook that you kind of hate and don’t mind ruining. Don’t use anything that makes you feel restricted or precious about painting these studies. Rejoice in the freedom an ugly sketchbook can offer you.

Good luck and stay experimental!

Paint Da Sharks

As promised I'm back today with some painting process stuff. I'm painting a series of sharks to make a taxonomy of them to sell alongside my dolphin and crystal prints at Crafty Wonderland. Even though they aren't conceptual pieces, I'm trying out some different painting techniques than usual and thought I'd share the joy. Today I'll be focusing on a Thresher Shark I've painted. Here's the initial sketch I spent all of 5 minutes on.

Thresher Shark Sketch Painting Process

You can see I just focused on the form of the shark and made a couple lines to note the curves of the form, meaning that the top is lighter then the middle or bottom, etc. Okay, so now for the good stuff. I heard somewhere that if you tend to use desaturated color you should make your underpainting really saturated and have decided to start trying that. For this series I also decided to play with hue by using whatever color I felt like, reality be damned, and only concerning myself with the saturation of the color to make the shape of the shark make sense in space. So here is a pic of my first hideous layer of paint for this guy.

Thresher Shark Underpainting Painting Process

I know, it's like "shield your eyes" right? While I painted this layer I looked at shark reference photos to determine what colors I could find in their bods, and then threw in some hot pinks and lime greens because I felt like. As I layered more gouache over the shark, I continued to focus on making shark body parts that were farther away from me less saturated and maintaining a soft lighting scheme. A few layers later he looked like this.

Thresher Shark Painting Process Layering Gouache

So by this point the shark is starting to make a little more sense I think. I've already made a lot of notes with my colors and have pretty much stopped looking at any reference images by now. Now I'm just working on making my shark seem dimensional. So I paint paint paint until he looks like this.

Painting Thresher Shark in Gouache Process

By this point a lot of the work is done, but detailing becomes really important. For instance the eye and face of the shark needed more definition at this stage. And I wanted to be sure to add highlights to make him look more fishy. I also wanted to darken his belly a bit to make him seem rounder. So I addressed all the things and here's a pic of the finished shark as he actually looks, as well as a picture of him after I took him into photoshop and played with hue until I found out it would have been better if I'd made him red.

Gouache Painting Thresher Sharks Illustration

The above infographic is brought to you by The Curious Wild, proving once again that hindsight is 20/20 and that red is better. Thanks for stopping by and, until next time, stay wild my dudes.

A Crab-tastic Painting Process

This week I wanted to take you through the planning and painting process of my most recent painting. It all started with an idea - *cue dream sequence music and slow fade*...

CONCEPT ART

Pom Pom Crab Concept Art Sketch

Specifically with THIS idea. I've wanted to put a Pom Pom Crab in a painting for a while because they amuse me. If you're unfamiliar with them, Pom Pom Crabs are a tiny creb that snip pieces off of poisonous sea anemones and either bandy them about like short swords in their crab hands, or attach them to the back of their crab bods as a means of warding off predators. So I took the idea of a crab waving an anemone at me and mentally connected it to the archetype of a grumpy old man yelling at kids to get off his lawn. Crab was now defending his turf, so I needed to give him turf. For his home I used a Red Fox Skull as a base because I think they look cool and I wanted to draw one. Then I filled the skull with an impossible combination of sea and forest dwelling plants because it's my painting and I do what I want. Then I wanted to emphasize the oblivious personality of the crab so I added some fish trespassers hiding out in the nose of the skull, and some octopus eggs attached to skull which would inevitably come with an octo-mom hiding behind them. Octo-mom's presence is felt but never seen because I wanted the crab to be the focal point. After the hit it and quit it sketch you see above I drew all the elements I wanted in the piece separately and then combined them into this final sketch.

Painting Process

Concept Art Ink Drawing

I scanned this line drawing in and played around with some color palette ideas, as well as painting some tiny little watercolor color comps traditionally until I thought I'd found the right vibe. I also digitally added the lines in the background and the circles near the crab as ways to include a background that emphasized the movement of things in the piece as well as to create additional depth. After all these things were done I printed out my sketch and transferred it using graphite transfer paper to a prepared wood panel that I planned to paint the crab on. Then I started painting.

Acrylic Gouache Painting Process

Using Holbein Acryla-Gouache I started with background elements including the lines behind the skull and circles near the crab, as well as some paint splatter and scribbly bits to even out the space and add some crab chi to the piece. Then I did the skull since it takes up so much surface area and I wanted to get the colors on it right.

crab-painting-process

Next I painted the ferns in the background and for some unknown reason I then painted the succulent and moss, but that was silly and I should have painted the things behind them first.

Aoede Pando Painting

Then I painted and painted for what seemed years until I'd gotten most things added. In a choice I will regret until my death, I waited until last to paint the mushrooms in the front of the skull and completely botched the colors on them. I asked my non-artist husband what he'd do to fix them and he said to "sparkle them up with some purple shit". Taking this sage advice to heart I made them purple and covered them in gold. I repainted the shrooms several times before eventually deciding they had reached an acceptable level and I couldn't look at them anymore.

crab-painting-process-pic

The scan of the final piece is below. This painting is titled "It's Only Good If It's A Weapon" and is currently hanging at Fresh Pot on Washington in downtown Portland. It'll be there for the whole month of March along with a lot of other original pieces and stickers for sale, so I encourage you to stop by if you're in the neighborhood.

acrylic-gouache-painting-process_crab_the-curious-wild_aoede-pando.jpg

Before signing off I wanted to announce I've been accepted to participate in Crafty Wonderland this May 5th at the Oregon Convention Center. I''ll be making lots on fun new things for the event so follow me on Instagram to stay up to date on those. If you're local and plan on stopping by Crafty Wonderland, please come by and introduce yourself, I'd love to meet you! 

Show at Townshend's & More Nudibranchs!

I'm happy to say the show at Townshend's Tea House on Mississippi Ave. is finally up and available to be seen by the peoples. Here are a couple shots of one of the walls.

crystals_the-curious-wild-aoede.JPG
dolphins_the-curious-wild-aoede.JPG

At home, the painting continues. I have two more finished nudibranchs to share for now, with more still underway. Pictures will be below. But before I share them, I'm also excited to say that I've applied to be a part of my first art fair. If you read my list of goals for 2018 a couple blog posts back, you'll know that doing my first event was a goal I'd set for myself this year. I'd imagined that it would be farther in the future than this, but I suppose when the right opportunity presents itself it's better to hustle than miss it. So I'm keeping my fingers and toes crossed that I get in to the one I've applied for. If not though it's okay - there's an entire year left ahead of me to keep trying. Alright, now on to the sluggos.

Cadlina Luteomarginata. This piece is titled "I've Become One With The Wallpaper".

Cadlina Luteomarginata. This piece is titled "I've Become One With The Wallpaper".

Acanthodoris Lutea. This piece is titled "Podcasts All Damn Day". Because that's my life.

Acanthodoris Lutea. This piece is titled "Podcasts All Damn Day". Because that's my life.

Sea Slugs and Café Shows

Hey everybody! I'm delighted to show you some scans of the first two Nudibranchs (sea slugs) I've painted for a series I'm doing right now. The sluggos will eventually be made into a taxonomical print, the originals sold, and stickers made, etc. Here are the first little guys!

Elysia Ornata a.k.a. the Ornate Leaf Slug. This piece is titled "This is gonna be a good year."

Elysia Ornata a.k.a. the Ornate Leaf Slug. This piece is titled "This is gonna be a good year."

Jorunna Parva a.k.a. the Sea Bunny. This piece is titled "I sometimes pretend my life is a TV show."

Jorunna Parva a.k.a. the Sea Bunny. This piece is titled "I sometimes pretend my life is a TV show."

I really only needed to paint the slugs for my project but I decided to have a little fun and make mini paintings out of them. I'll crop them out of their surroundings for the taxonomy when I've finished painting them all. They will all be painted with acrylic gouache like these two were.

These Nudibranchs, along with many original paintings I've completed over the last several months, will be up on display and for sale at Townshend's Tea House on Mississippi Ave. here in Portland, OR through the month of February, so if you're a local feel free to stop by. See you next time, and in the meanwhile stay wild!

Baby Turtles and 2018 Goals

Hey everyone and happy new year! I'm off to a late start this year, having come down with the flu of death a few weeks ago and only recently recovered. But I'm better now and have recently finished my first painting of 2018, a little Burmese Star Tortoise that I'll be hanging in Townshend's Tea House on Mississippi next month along with some other originals and prints. If you're in the PDX area, please stop by and take a look!

burmese-tortoise

I made a process video showing the stages of painting this turtle that will be up on my Instagram later today if you'd like to see the steps I took. I painted this guy in acrylic gouache, a medium I have yet to comprehend and have much to learn about.

2018 Illustration Goals

I really appreciate hearing other artists share their goals for the year, so I thought I'd share mine with you.  These are just a few, but I'm sure that I'll be adding more to the list as the year kicks in!

  • Participate in my first Art Fair. I've never gone out and gotten a booth at a fair or convention before and this year is the year I want to take that step.
  • Start accepting commissions. I want to start accepting commissions from individuals as well as editorial work. 
  • Maintain a better work/life balance. I realized this last year that I wasn't making enough time for myself and my wellbeing in my schedule. So this year I'm trying to take weekends off, get back into some yoga classes, and make sure to get out into nature more.
  • Sketchbooks! I really want to up my sketchbooking game this year, and instead of only using sketch time to study anatomy, or practice values, etc...I want to just stop thinking and sketch for fun. I like to imagine it like stream-of-consciousness writing - I don't care if I understand why I'm drawing a pigeon, I want to just let myself draw that pigeon without caring if it's anatomically accurate. I can worry about those things later, I just want to get the sketch down and play with things for fun. Yay for self expression.
  • Requisite art goals. The ones we all have. Improve my color choices, push my gestures, emphasize values and relationships, get loose where I should be loose and tight where I should be tight. And so on and so forth - far too many things to mention that I want to improve in my craft.

So those are a few of the more important goals I have this year. I'd love to hear what goals you have for your creative life this year so please feel free to let me know in the comments. See you next time!